7 Craft Fair Mistakes to Avoid for Sellers

Sharing is Caring - Spread the Love! 🙂Email this to someonePin on Pinterest101Share on Facebook15Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0

Have you ever perused a craft fair and walked into a booth and been totally unimpressed, or worse yet, even troubled by what you saw? Whether you are a new craft fair vendor or seasoned seller, there are costly mistakes you may not have considered that will lose sales.  Are you guilty of any of the following craft fair mistakes?

1. Your Display is Flat

And by flat, I don’t just mean laying flat on the table, I mean flat everything – from lighting to color schemes.  If your products blend into your background, are not arranged nicely, or worse yet are spread flat on table tops with nothing at eye level, I guarantee it is costing you sales.  Your display is MORE important than your products.  How can that be?  Your display is what captures a persons interest, and if done properly, holds it.

*idea* Use visually interesting and versatile displays like the tree below. It can hold jewelry, or ornaments, or you could even clip paper products to it. It gets items up in an interesting way, without being too distracting from your product. I’ve used two similar items that I lit from underneath – people wanted to buy my displays! :).


2. Your Booth Appears Disorganized and Cluttered

If your booth has too much going on, has items out of order or strewn about, it will cause customers to leave your booth empty handed.  People love a nice, orderly booth where they can easily see the items.  You want to avoid too much empty space, but you don’t want to jam pack areas either.  Organization is key and make sure things flow nicely.

*idea* Consider using eye catching, cute organizers.  I love the crocheted baskets below.  They look crafty and are super easy to transport.  Imagine the cute things that can displayed in them.


3. You Act Disinterested, Are Eating, or Talking to Others and Not Your Customers

I don’t want to be hounded, but if I walk into a stall and the crafter is stuffing his face while staring me down and doesn’t say hello, I’m out.  It’s rude.  It’s very easy to be polite and say hello, how are you? or simply make eye contact and say hi.  Craft fair vendors who are rude or who don’t consider their behaviors lose business.

4. You Don’t Have Business Cards

You need to have business cards with current information, preferably ones that stand out from the crowd and are displayed prominently.  A card should also accompany every single purchase.  This is not only professional, it builds trust with others and they may be more inclined to purchase from you if they know they can contact you in case of a problem (or to make orders in the future!)

Need some business card ideas? I have a post all about creating great business cards.

5. Your Space is Too Open

You want your customers looking at your products while in your booth, not eyeing your neighbors things.  When possible use walls, or build up your display in such a way that it minimizes outside distractions.  You are competing with many other vendors and you want to keep your potential customers attention.

*idea* A sidewall kit not only gives you great, distraction free shopping, it provides shade and shelter.  Most sidewall and canopy materials are waterproof and flame retardant.  They also ensure privacy if you need to seal off your items overnight during shows. During your show you can hang items and use the walls as a backdrop to your items.


6. You Don’t Have “Touchable” Items

People establish a sense of ownership through touch and are more likely to buy a product if they have held it in their hands for 30 seconds or more.  Even if you prefer customers to not touch your better pieces, have at least a small section of your booth dedicated to items people can pick up and feel.

If you wrap all your soaps in fabric or paper for example, keep one bar out that people can touch.  Same with jewelry, have mirrors available so people can try on necklaces, bracelets and see them etc.

7. You’re Not Making Good Use of Overhead and Side Spaces

Don’t underestimate the power of hanging a garland or some lights along the top of your booth.  It catches the eye and gets the customer to see the “whole booth”.  Treat your booth as a mini retail shop with good signage, light (when available) and a top to bottom, coordinated approach.  Your booth is an item – think of it that way.  When you display an item, you want the whole thing to look and feel its best to make it appealing.  Your booth is the same.

So, there you have it my top 7 mistakes.  I am sure I can think of more and will share them in upcoming posts.  If you are guilty of any of these, and I’m pretty sure we all have been, then take some time to clean up your act – or booth 🙂 and watch your sales improve.

Save

Sharing is Caring - Spread the Love! 🙂Email this to someonePin on Pinterest101Share on Facebook15Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0

Author: Christin

Christin has been loving life as a freelance writer and artist for 15 years and is dedicated to using her skills and creativity to help others succeed doing what they enjoy. She owns and runs several sites and blogs that center on her various passions, from simple living to art, design and writing. You can check out more of her work on HubPages at http://christins.hubpages.com/

1 thought on “7 Craft Fair Mistakes to Avoid for Sellers”

Leave a Reply